Press "Enter" to skip to content

Unexpected ‘Germline’ Plant Cells May Shield New Generations

Last updated on August 6, 2019

Unexpected ‘Germline’ Plant Cells May Shield New Generations

https://www.quantamagazine.org/unexpected-germline-plant-cells-may-shield-new-generations-20190805/Research suggests that flowers and other new structures in plants may grow from specialized stem cells that divide as few times as possible. By staying inactive, the cells may protect the DNA passed down to future generations. Karel Říha’s mutant plants were too healthy. The molecular biologist, a postdoctoral researcher in Texas in the year 2000, was breeding botany’s leading model organism, Arabidopsis, an unremarkable weed in the mustard family. He had carefully chosen a strain with a mutation that robbed the plants of their ability to repair the caps at the end of their DNA. With every cell division, these protective telomeres grew shorter, hastening the plants’ inevitable genetic meltdown. Unexpected ‘Germline’ Plant Cells May Shield New Generations

 

Mission News Theme by Compete Themes.